Child pedestrian casualties and inequality again

10 Dec 2008 by Karl Hallam

'The leading cause of childhood injury and death is road crashes, which kill 260,000 a year globally and injure about 10 million.'

 

'Children from poorer families are far more likely to die or be harmed than their better-off counterparts,' according to the WHO.

 

'The poorer children have not shared equally in the progress of the last 20 years.'

 

This is not news, but is reported as news regularly by newspapers, which sometimes behave in ways that suggest their readers are like goldfish. While papers like the Guardian deserve credit for writing about these issues, it would be better if they referenced their own articles that cover the same subject. In this case, the following three refer to the inequality in child pedestrian casualties in the UK.

 

'Poverty puts children at higher risk of accidents' - 2008

'Pedestrian road deaths linked to deprivation' - 2008

'Road death risk higher for deprived children' - 2002

 

The fact that around 3,000 people die on the roads every year in the UK and 3,000 die every day globally (which we highlighted recently) masks 'a very deep social divide, a strong and persistent social divide' (as Professor of Child Health, Elizabeth Towner, puts it), only goes to emphasise how big an issue this is.

Cadence's Karl Hallam worked on 'Streets Ahead - Safe and liveable streets for children' and is currently looking at global road safety issues with ippr in advance of a United Nations Ministerial road safety conference in 2009.

 

your comments

Rajesh
Posts: 4
Comment
Your challenges neve
Reply #4 on : Sun October 20, 2013, 05:54:38
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Dilla
Posts: 4
Comment
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Reply #3 on : Thu September 26, 2013, 14:21:08
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Sharon
Posts: 4
Comment
and yet another ob
Reply #2 on : Tue September 24, 2013, 19:19:08
and yet another obuvsioly very unhappy current and long standing senior civil servant:The question that you pose is interesting.In the old days the makeup of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) were largely public Oxbridge and school types, however, the majority of them had honour, integrity, followed the Civil Service Code, and had the national and public interest at heart. Over the years political intervention has created significant changes to the SCS and the lower grades, and the Civil Service has become extremely political, the senior ranks have become motivated by greed, and it struggles to present itself as being a number of successful corporate commercial organisations I shall return to this later. The Next Steps initiative saw the creation of agencies, and shortly after that many of those agencies became trading funds. Senior staff SCS staff lying beneath executive status began to feel uncomfortable, were provided targets, became unsettled and threatened as they saw their future career opportunities being filled by outsiders (brought in by politicians). Overnight their futures were no longer guaranteed, and they began to develop strategies to meet targets and survive within this new environment (all else was out of the window – this is a matter of survival). Many saw industry as being the threat, and prepared defensive strategies, whilst others were developing strategies to protect themselves against their new masters, and the politicians. They needed to conceal their failures, needed to meet their targets, and deliver programmes on cost which they previously been hidden by re-defining the goal posts. A clear indication of things going wrong was the consistency and accuracy with which they repeatedly hit their targets. The managers were becoming Corporate Psychopathic Bullies, protecting themselves with mobs of trainee Bullies, who in turn were protecting themselves with seed corn Bullies eager for promotion. The management paths were soon the only paths for advancement, hence, staff that would have struggled along the professional route were now becoming managers. Areas were by now so overspent that staff were committing fraud and locked into their jobs to prevent outsiders from understanding their business. Professional staff were told that this was normal commercial practices, however management professionals brought in from the commercial sector were filled with horror, ignored, Bullied, and thus had to conform to survive. Outsiders like politicians, National Audit Office (NAO) were ushered, so that they only communicated with ‘right people’. The NAO would have been confused by the complexity of the system but convinced that these nice people were doing a good job. In essence the true workings were a closed shop to outsiders, and even the executive.David Kelly, Richard Holmes, and I’m sure many others were Bullied. Staff surveys identify these behaviours. The whole system is operated by the management, and few staff are prepared to step forward because the Bullies control the ‘processes and procedures’, ‘enquiry panels’, and might lose their ‘jobs and pensions’.The agencies have strengthened their ability to bully staff by:b7 Internalising complaints, and appeals, processes to within their organisations. Agency staff are denied access to the Civil Service Commission.b7 Staff are judged on their behaviours (this is a subjective judgment of managers against which it is very difficult for the Civil Servants to defend themselves against), managers can isolate staff from the work programme, and deny them work.b7 Internal and external job opportunities are managed.b7 Agencies create their own grades and associated pay scales.b7 The agencies creating their own rules regulations and disciplinary procedures. Such processes are poorly defined and are subverted by managers). Since each agency are creating their own processes and procedures this leads results extra cost, and a lack of consistency. Furthermore by internalising the implementation of such processes means that employees have no access to independent appeal. Managers disregard the Civil Service as they believe that it is embraced by their processes and procedures.b7 Staff who are seen as problems, particularly union officials, are paid generous packages and given none disclosure agreements. Others are denied work, isolated, put into unsuitable positions with causing constructive dismissal, and interestingly the Cabinet Office and government are aiding in this.b7 Standards have reduced.Civilian Management Services (CMS) have been disbanded and replaced by Human Resource (HR) departments. The difference here is that where CMS managed Civil Service careers, HR is a defence mechanism to protect the management from their employees.The tip of the iceberg began to be exposed by the Bernard Grey report, however all has slowed down, and we have yet to see a solution, and as we know from the Titanic – more is hidden beneath the waterline. I’m sure that the agencies have wined dined and surrounded him with the ‘right people’.As time has gone by, in the interest of increased efficiency, the checks, and balances, have been removed opening up greater dangers.The fundamental problem is, like the banks, the Civil Service cannot be seen to fail (this is why they are not ‘corporate commercial organisations’), however, as Hayek and Schumpeter recognise, businesses need to fail to cleanse their management systems. The only thing we can do is watch and learn from these real life experiments and hope that such knowledge is passed on to future generations. The Civil Service is in terminal decline being eaten from the core outwards. The system is complex to understand what is happening you need to understand the whole apple.Honour, integrity, a sense of fair play, and a devotion to UK PLC is important (perhaps qualities of Oxbridge and Public school life), however, this is now lost and has been replaced with a culture of selfishness (schoolboy behaviours of the masses).
Zeb
Posts: 4
Comment
5M5cQvYaCiIi
Reply #1 on : Sun September 22, 2013, 08:08:59
and yet another olsbouviy very unhappy current and long standing senior civil servant:The question that you pose is interesting.In the old days the makeup of the Senior Civil Service (SCS) were largely public Oxbridge and school types, however, the majority of them had honour, integrity, followed the Civil Service Code, and had the national and public interest at heart. Over the years political intervention has created significant changes to the SCS and the lower grades, and the Civil Service has become extremely political, the senior ranks have become motivated by greed, and it struggles to present itself as being a number of successful corporate commercial organisations I shall return to this later. The Next Steps initiative saw the creation of agencies, and shortly after that many of those agencies became trading funds. Senior staff SCS staff lying beneath executive status began to feel uncomfortable, were provided targets, became unsettled and threatened as they saw their future career opportunities being filled by outsiders (brought in by politicians). Overnight their futures were no longer guaranteed, and they began to develop strategies to meet targets and survive within this new environment (all else was out of the window – this is a matter of survival). Many saw industry as being the threat, and prepared defensive strategies, whilst others were developing strategies to protect themselves against their new masters, and the politicians. They needed to conceal their failures, needed to meet their targets, and deliver programmes on cost which they previously been hidden by re-defining the goal posts. A clear indication of things going wrong was the consistency and accuracy with which they repeatedly hit their targets. The managers were becoming Corporate Psychopathic Bullies, protecting themselves with mobs of trainee Bullies, who in turn were protecting themselves with seed corn Bullies eager for promotion. The management paths were soon the only paths for advancement, hence, staff that would have struggled along the professional route were now becoming managers. Areas were by now so overspent that staff were committing fraud and locked into their jobs to prevent outsiders from understanding their business. Professional staff were told that this was normal commercial practices, however management professionals brought in from the commercial sector were filled with horror, ignored, Bullied, and thus had to conform to survive. Outsiders like politicians, National Audit Office (NAO) were ushered, so that they only communicated with ‘right people’. The NAO would have been confused by the complexity of the system but convinced that these nice people were doing a good job. In essence the true workings were a closed shop to outsiders, and even the executive.David Kelly, Richard Holmes, and I’m sure many others were Bullied. Staff surveys identify these behaviours. The whole system is operated by the management, and few staff are prepared to step forward because the Bullies control the ‘processes and procedures’, ‘enquiry panels’, and might lose their ‘jobs and pensions’.The agencies have strengthened their ability to bully staff by:b7 Internalising complaints, and appeals, processes to within their organisations. Agency staff are denied access to the Civil Service Commission.b7 Staff are judged on their behaviours (this is a subjective judgment of managers against which it is very difficult for the Civil Servants to defend themselves against), managers can isolate staff from the work programme, and deny them work.b7 Internal and external job opportunities are managed.b7 Agencies create their own grades and associated pay scales.b7 The agencies creating their own rules regulations and disciplinary procedures. Such processes are poorly defined and are subverted by managers). Since each agency are creating their own processes and procedures this leads results extra cost, and a lack of consistency. Furthermore by internalising the implementation of such processes means that employees have no access to independent appeal. Managers disregard the Civil Service as they believe that it is embraced by their processes and procedures.b7 Staff who are seen as problems, particularly union officials, are paid generous packages and given none disclosure agreements. Others are denied work, isolated, put into unsuitable positions with causing constructive dismissal, and interestingly the Cabinet Office and government are aiding in this.b7 Standards have reduced.Civilian Management Services (CMS) have been disbanded and replaced by Human Resource (HR) departments. The difference here is that where CMS managed Civil Service careers, HR is a defence mechanism to protect the management from their employees.The tip of the iceberg began to be exposed by the Bernard Grey report, however all has slowed down, and we have yet to see a solution, and as we know from the Titanic – more is hidden beneath the waterline. I’m sure that the agencies have wined dined and surrounded him with the ‘right people’.As time has gone by, in the interest of increased efficiency, the checks, and balances, have been removed opening up greater dangers.The fundamental problem is, like the banks, the Civil Service cannot be seen to fail (this is why they are not ‘corporate commercial organisations’), however, as Hayek and Schumpeter recognise, businesses need to fail to cleanse their management systems. The only thing we can do is watch and learn from these real life experiments and hope that such knowledge is passed on to future generations. The Civil Service is in terminal decline being eaten from the core outwards. The system is complex to understand what is happening you need to understand the whole apple.Honour, integrity, a sense of fair play, and a devotion to UK PLC is important (perhaps qualities of Oxbridge and Public school life), however, this is now lost and has been replaced with a culture of selfishness (schoolboy behaviours of the masses).

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